Our Physicians | Florida Orthopaedic Institute
was successfully added to your cart.
Category

Our Physicians

Florida Orthopaedic Institute Adds Two Orthopedic Physicians as Tampa Bay Area Continues to Flourish

By | Announcements, Our Physicians

Tampa, Fl. – September 16 – Florida Orthopaedic Institute (FOI) announces the recent hiring of Dr. Evan M. Loewy and Dr. George E. Eldayrie to its practice of more than 40 fellowship-trained physicians. Dr. Loewy is an orthopedic surgeon fellowship trained in foot and ankle surgery and Dr. Eldayrie is a primary care orthopedist fellowship trained in sports medicine.

“We are pleased to announce the addition of Evan Loewy, M.D., to our Division of Foot and Ankle Surgery,” says Dr. Roy Sanders, president, chief medical officer and founding member of Florida Orthopaedic Institute. “He joins Drs. Walling, Epting and myself in one of Florida’s largest and most respected total ankle replacement centers of excellence. His expertise will only add to our academic and patient centric practice.”

After his residency at the University of South Florida, Dr. Loewy went on to complete his Foot and Ankle Surgery fellowship at OrthoCarolina. Throughout his medical training, he has been recognized for his achievements in orthopedics. He was awarded for his outstanding accomplishments and contributions to the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

“Florida Orthopaedic Institute also welcomes George Eldayrie, M.D.,” Dr. Sanders said. “He completed his residency in Family Medicine at UF, serving as chief resident. He then completed his sports medicine fellowship at Wake Forest University. We are very much looking forward to the experience and care that he will bring as a primary care provider in orthopedics to both our Division of Sports Medicine and our patients.”

During his fellowship, Dr. Eldayrie trained in ultrasound-guided procedures including steroid, viscosupplementation and platelet rich plasma injections. While he sees many sports medicine injuries, he holds particular interest in concussions, running medicine, dance medicine, regenerative medicine and the treatment and prevention of arthritis.

Dr. Loewy began seeing patients on September 3 at the Brandon, North Tampa and South Tampa locations.

Dr. Eldayrie will begin seeing patients on October 1 at the Brandon and North Tampa locations in the Tampa Bay Area.

Florida Orthopaedic Institute

Founded in 1989, Florida Orthopaedic Institute is Florida’s largest orthopedic group and provides expertise and treatment of orthopedic-related injuries and conditions, including adult reconstruction and arthritis, chiropractic services, foot and ankle, general orthopedics, hand and wrist, interventional spine, musculoskeletal oncology, orthopedic trauma, physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy, sports medicine, shoulder and elbow, spine and chiropractic services, among others. The organization treats patients throughout its surgery centers in North Tampa and Citrus Park, two orthopaedic urgent care centers in South Tampa and Brandon, and 9 office locations in Bloomingdale, Brandon, Citrus Park, North Tampa, Northdale, Palm Harbor, South Tampa, Sun City Center and Wesley Chapel. For more information, please visit: FloridaOrtho.com and ‘like’ us on Facebook: facebook.com/Florida.Orthopaedic.Institute.

Florida Surgeons Seek to Spark Change in the Healthcare Industry

By | Announcements, Our Physicians

Dr. Mark Frankle, M.D. and Dr. Steven Lyons, M.D. Discuss Healthcare Legislature before Congress on Capitol Hill

Tampa, FL – Jul. 11, 2019 – During the 2019 American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) National Orthopaedic Leadership Conference (NOLC), orthopedic surgeons from across the country arrived on Capitol Hill to motivate Congress to support the Hospital Competition Act of 2019 (H.R. 506) and the Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act of 2019 (H.R. 1418, S.35).

Florida Orthopaedic Institute’s Dr. Mark Frankle, M.D. and Dr. Steven Lyons, M.D. were two of over 300 surgeons that met with congressional representatives last month to voice their support of the legislative bills that are slated to improve the overall care of their patients. The two were met by fellow Floridian, Val Demings, a United States Representative from Florida’s 10th congressional district, who talked with them at length about solving the problems currently within the healthcare system.

The Hospital Competition Act of 2019 seeks to increase the amount of choice and access patients have to healthcare by lifting the restrictions on physician-owned hospitals, discouraging the merging of hospitals and increasing price transparency among others.

The Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act of 2019 aims to provide more transparency and oversight into the healthcare industry by ensuring that federal antitrust laws also apply to the health insurance business.

Also supported on Capitol Hill was the Protecting People from Surprise Medical Bills Act. This bill seeks to provide patients with a means to overcome ‘surprise’ medical bills. Unexpected billing not only impacts cost on the patient’s end, but also affects the relationship between the patient and the physician.

Orthopaedic surgeons from across the country, including your physicians at Florida Orthopaedic Institute seek to ensure the greatest of outcomes for their patients. In supporting these bills, the satisfaction rate among patients only has potential to increase.

To view previous announcements, please follow this link.

Florida Orthopaedic Institute

Founded in 1989, Florida Orthopaedic Institute is Florida’s largest orthopedic group and provides expertise and treatment of orthopedic-related injuries and conditions, including adult reconstruction and arthritis, chiropractic services, foot and ankle, general orthopedics, hand and wrist, interventional spine, musculoskeletal oncology, orthopedic trauma, physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy, sports medicine, shoulder and elbow, spine and chiropractic services, among others. The organization treats patients throughout its surgery centers in North Tampa and Citrus Park, two orthopaedic urgent care centers in South Tampa and Brandon, and 9 office locations in Bloomingdale, Brandon, Citrus Park, North Tampa, Northdale, Palm Harbor, South Tampa, Sun City Center and Wesley Chapel. For more information, please visit: FloridaOrtho.com and ‘like’ us on Facebook: facebook.com/Florida.Orthopaedic.Institute

Dr. Donna Saatman retires from practicing with Florida Orthopaedic Institute

By | Announcements, Our Physicians

On June 28th, 2019 Dr. Donna Saatman retired from practicing with Florida Orthopaedic Institute.

Patients, referring physicians and employees thank her for years of dedication, providing the highest quality care for patients.

After graduating as the first female resident from the University of South Florida’s neurosurgery program, Dr. Saatman provided unsurpassed patient care for 10 years at a private clinic in Brandon, Florida, where she served as president and chief neurosurgeon before joining Florida Orthopaedic Institute in 2014.

As an expert in the field of neurosurgery, Dr. Saatman has delivered numerous local and national lectures, attended clinical courses to expand her areas of expertise and participates in the American Board of Neurological Surgery Maintenance of Certification program.

In addition to her daily practice, she served on several medical advisory boards and participated in two national clinical outcomes trials.

Cultural Competence Is a Continuous Learning Opportunity

By | FOI in the News, Our Physicians
By: Kaitlyn D’Onofrio

Improve your communication with patients with different experiences

The population is increasingly diverse, and physicians likely interact with patients whose cultures and life experiences differ from their own. This could impact patient-physician interactions and communication.

During a career development session at the AAOS 2019 Annual Meeting, Hassan R. Mir, MD, MBA, FACS, director of the orthopaedic residency program and director of orthopaedic research at the Florida Orthopaedic Institute and associate professor at the University of South Florida, discussed tactful ways to communicate with patients of different cultures and explained why cultural competence requires being open to learning.

Patient-centered care involves including patients and their families in medical decision-making. When communicating, the patient should be the center of the conversation; this is always the goal, Dr. Mir said.

Patient-centered care involves four tiers: “whole person” care, ready access, comprehensive communication and coordination, and patient support and empowerment. The former two components fall under the health policy umbrella, whereas the latter factors encompass the physician-patient relationship.

Patients have become more concerned with the duration of time physicians commit during a visit than their education and training. An AAOS survey on patient expectations and perceptions of communication obtained different results when conducted in 1998 and 2008. In the earlier survey, 87 percent of patients expected their providers to be highly trained; by 2008, this dropped to 82 percent. In 1998, 35 percent of respondents said they expected their providers to both spend time answering questions and be caring and compassionate; 10 years later, those figures rose to 51 percent and 55 percent, respectively.

Complete clinical care is two-pronged, requiring the completion of communication and biomedical tasks. Communication tasks are:

  • engagement
    • verbal (speaking calmly, asking open-ended questions, avoiding interruptions)
    • nonverbal (making eye contact, smiling, sitting to speak with the patient)
  • empathy
    • establish trust
  • education
    • interactive (asking the patient to explain the visit in his or her own words)
  • enlistment
    • shared decision-making

Several medical decision-making models can be considered: paternalistic (clinician is dominant; patient is passive), consumeristic (emphasis on patients’ rights and clinical obligations), and mutualistic (equal patient-clinician involvement). In most scenarios, the ideal approach is mutualistic. However, in situations where there is only one best-practice treatment option with unequivocal evidence and the patient is low risk, the paternalistic model might be most effective.


Hassan R. Mir, MD, MBA, FACS, discusses communication tactics when interacting with patients with different experiences.

In preference-sensitive treatment discussions, there may be multiple reasonable options, for which a risk/benefit analysis should be conducted. In such cases, shared decision-making is most suitable.

Health literacy can impact a patient’s outcomes, Dr. Mir noted. Evidence has shown links among low literacy, poor education, poor health, and early death. During discussions about surgical procedures, a patient’s health literacy must encompass an understanding of the condition, treatment options, interventions, and post-surgical plan. A few helpful communication aids include written, pictorial, audio, video, and interactive media tools, as well as support groups.

Even in the presence of preventive measures and a well-planned strategy, adverse events (AEs) can occur—necessitating prior shared decision-making and informed consent. Should an AE occur, the physician may experience feelings of sadness or guilt, possibly becoming defensive, whereas the patient and family will likely feel fear, confusion, and anger. In such scenarios, the physician’s plan must include:

  • open communication with the healthcare team
  • open communication with the patient and family
  • a discussion of all aspects (details, possible causes, proposed course of action)
  • an apology without accepting blame (this does not suggest admission of wrongdoing)

Patients who receive full disclosure will have more trust in their physicians and will be less likely to take legal action, Dr. Mir added.

Cultural differences can make communication challenging, but it is crucial to provide culturally competent care to a variety of patients. Dr. Mir defined culturally competent care as “the ability to understand and work with patients whose beliefs, values, and histories are significantly different from our own.”

For engaging with patients with cultural differences, Dr. Mir suggested upgrading the classic “Golden Rule” to the “Platinum Rule”: rather than treating others as you would like to be treated, treat others as they would like to be treated.

Failing to provide culturally competent care could result in harm to patients and your practice. Consequences could include:

  • alienating your patients
  • misdiagnosing their medical problems
  • nonadherence to your treatment plans
  • worse outcomes
  • poor word-of-mouth for you and your practice

Dr. Mir suggested that physicians become familiar with the cultures and beliefs of their patients and families. He acknowledged that being a clinical expert is not the same as being a communication expert, so he urged physicians to be open to learning and changing their behaviors and attitudes. When they are becoming educated about a different culture, generalizations may help them focus their thoughts and provide potential background, but only if that is followed by recognizing each patient as an individual. Stereotypes, on the other hand, are oversimplified, could be offensive, and do not consider the patient as an individual.

Dr. Mir also recommended AAOS’ Culturally Competent Care resources, including the AAOS diversity webpage and the AAOS Culturally Competent Care guidebook and test, which provide six hours of continuing medical education.

Kaitlyn D’Onofrio is the associate editor for AAOS Now. She can be reached at kdonofrio@aaos.org.

Dr. Gasser & FOI Physicians to Lead FORE Orthopaedic Conference in Clearwater

By | Announcements, Our Physicians

Course Director Dr. Seth Gasser and FORE will host an orthopaedic continuing medical education conference in Clearwater this summerJuly 26-28, 2019. 

 

This conference is open to physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and other allied healthcare professionals. 

The Foundation for Orthopaedic Research & Education (FORE) is proud to announce that Florida Orthopaedic Institute surgeon Dr. Seth Gasser is once again directing the Orthopaedics for the Primary Care Practitioner & Rehabilitation Therapist course this July. This conference is designed to provide healthcare professionals with the most current diagnostic and treatment options in the orthopaedic sub-specialties. A distinguished faculty, many of whom are FOI physicians, will present recent advances in trauma and fracture fixation, arthritis management, joint reconstruction, treatment of sports-related conditions, spine surgery, hand and upper extremity evaluation and management, and physical therapy. 

Orthopaedics for the Primary Care Practitioner & Rehabilitation Therapist 

July 26-28, 2019
Sandpearl Resort
Clearwater, Florida
Registration Link: https://foreonline.org/gasser-orthocourse-2019

Participants will be given ample time for interactive discussions and opportunities to interact with faculty, plus hands-on workshops. Faculty from FOI that will be presenting at this conference are:

  • Christopher Baker, MD
  • Eddy Echols, MD
  • Timothy Epting, DO
  • Michael Garcia, MD
  • Christopher Grayson, MD
  • Alfred Hess, MD
  • Benjamin Maxson, DO
  • Mark A. Mighell, MD
  • Michael Miranda, DO
  • Jason Nydick, DO
  • Brian Palumbo, MD
  • Ioannis Pappou, MD
  • Donna Saatman, MD
  • Jeff Sellman, MD
  • Anjan Shah, MD
  • John Small, MD
  • Steven Tresser, MD
  • Seung Yi, MD

This 3-day conference features didactic lectures, case presentations, and a hands-on ultrasound and injections workshop. This live continuing education activity is approved for the following:

  • Physicians – 18.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™
  • Athletic trainers – 18.75 Category A hours/CEUs
  • Physical Therapists – 18.75 CE hours

FOI staff receive a $100 discount when registering for the course, by using code FOI100. For registration, agenda, and more course information, please visit https://foreonline.org/gasser-orthocourse-2019

Florida Orthopaedic Institute Announces New Orthopedic Surgeon

By | Announcements, Our Physicians

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Media Contact
Donna Bossuyt
(813) 480-4591
dbossuyt@floridaortho.com

FLORIDA ORTHOPAEDIC INSTITUTE ANNOUNCES NEW ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON

Tampa, Fl. – February 28, 2019 – Florida Orthopaedic Institute (FOI) announces the recent hiring of Dr. David M. Donohue to its practice of more than 40 fellowship-trained physicians. Dr. Donohue is an orthopedic surgeon who is fellowship trained in orthopedic trauma and adult reconstruction and arthritis.

“Dr. Donohue brings a wealth of experience and understanding of trauma and adult reconstruction solutions that will allow us to extend our arthritic services to patients,” says Dr. Roy Sanders, president and chief medical officer of Florida Orthopaedic Institute. “We’re delighted to have him join our growing team.”

After his residency at the University of South Florida, Dr. Donohue went on to complete his Orthopedic Trauma Surgery fellowship at Harborview Medical Center. He obtained his second fellowship in Adult Reconstruction and Arthritis Surgery upon returning to Tampa.

“Florida Orthopaedic Institute is unique,” Dr. Donohue said. “This is because of our affiliation with the University of South Florida and our commitment to the education of medical students, residents and fellows. In addition to providing conscientious patient care, my goal is to further the academic pursuits of our group and the university in orthopedic trauma and adult reconstruction.”

Dr. Donohue has contributed to several published chapters and peer-reviewed articles regarding topics such as treatment of infection, biomechanics, orthopedic trauma and computer navigated assistance. He has also given lectures nationally pertaining to orthopedic trauma repair. Among others, Dr. Donohue is a member of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA), the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the Foundation for Orthopaedic Trauma (FOT).

Dr. Donohue began seeing patients February 25, 2019 at the Brandon, North Tampa and South Tampa offices in the Tampa Bay area.
Florida Orthopaedic Institute

Founded in 1989, Florida Orthopaedic Institute is Florida’s largest orthopedic group and provides expertise and treatment of orthopedic-related injuries and conditions, including adult reconstruction and arthritis, chiropractic services, foot and ankle, general orthopedics, hand and wrist, interventional spine, musculoskeletal oncology, orthopedic trauma, physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical and occupational therapy, sports medicine, shoulder and elbow, spine and chiropractic services, among others. The organization treats patients throughout its surgery centers in North Tampa and Citrus Park, two orthopaedic urgent care centers in South Tampa and Brandon, and 9 office locations in Bloomingdale, Brandon, Citrus Park, North Tampa, Northdale, Palm Harbor, South Tampa, Sun City Center and Wesley Chapel. For more information, please visit: FloridaOrtho.com and ‘like’ us on Facebook: facebook.com/Florida.Orthopaedic.Institute.

###

Fixing, salvaging radial head after fracture may prevent severe future injuries

By | FOI in the News, Our Physicians

Healio

BY: Casey Tingle
January 16, 2019

Fixing, salvaging radial head after fracture may prevent severe future injuries

WAIKOLOA, Hawaii — When faced with a radial head fracture, surgeons should fix it when possible and replace it when not salvageable to avoid more severe injuries, according to a presenter at Orthopedics Today Hawaii.

According to Mark A. Mighell, MD, type 2 radial head fractures can be treated either operatively or nonoperatively, with most able to be treated nonoperatively.

“Even when they are displaced 2 mm to 5 mm it is usually that portion of the radial head that is not supported with the strong subchondral bone,” Mighell said in his presentation.

When performing internal fixation, Mighell noted the plates need to be placed in the safe zone and either headless or 2 mm screws should be placed off the articular margin.

Surgeons should not perform tenuous fixation on a type 3 radial head fracture, according to Mighell.

“Plating provides the greatest torsional rigidity vs. pins, but … if you place the lag screws like Graham King has shown us, you can get more stability to that construct, also,” Mighell said.

For radial head arthroplasty, he noted all bony fragments should be removed from the elbow and to resect a minimal amount of bone.

“Do not get crazy with cutting down the neck of the radius to get down to where you need to be,” Mighell said. “You want to deliver the proximal radius and avoid injury to the [posterior interosseous nerve] PIN.”

One mistake Mighell noted he sees is when surgeons place too big a piece of metal in the radial head.

“You should replace what you took out,” he said. “You are not sticking a big hunk of metal in. That does not make your elbow any more stable.”

He added the height of the radial head “should be the same as the lesser sigmoid notch of the coronoid,” and the radial length should be within about 2.5 mm.

“If you get it too much more than 2.5 [mm] you are going to overstuff the lateral side of the joint, the consequences of which are that the medial side narrows … and they get arthritic change,” Mighell said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Mighell MA, et al. Should you be trying to save the radial head? Presented at: Orthopedics Today Hawaii; Jan. 13-17, 2019; Waikoloa, Hawaii.

Disclosure: Mighell reports he is on the speakers bureau and is a paid consultant for DJO Surgical and Stryker, and receives research support as a primary investigator from DJO Surgical.

###

Speaker discusses intraoperative, postoperative rotator cuff complications

By | FOI in the News, Our Physicians

Healio

BY: Casey Tingle
January 16, 2019

Speaker discusses intraoperative, postoperative rotator cuff complications

WAIKOLOA, Hawaii — In a presentation at Orthopedics Today Hawaii, Mark A. Mighell, MD, discussed intraoperative and postoperative complications in rotator cuff repair and how to handle these complications.

In patients with cysts or poor-quality bone, Mighell said in his presentation that it is important to get the tendon to heal. He noted nonoperative treatment is ideal because a tear associated with a cyst is not traumatic in nature. However, when surgery is needed for a large cyst, Mighell said to take care of the poor-quality bone.

For patients with poor tissue quality, Mighell noted previously published literature has shown good results infusing the tendon with fiber tape.

He advised to always be prepared in the event of a large rotator cuff tear that is medialized to the glenoid and the tissue is immobile.

“Always be prepared to have something there available and, in this case, we chose to use one of those dermal grafts,” Mighell said.

He continued, “That means you are looking at your MRI scan [and] you are doing preoperative planning. You do not want to get into surgery and then find you cannot fix the tendon.”

When performing superior capsular reconstruction to repair large rotator cuff tears with immobile tissues, Mighell recommended using a graft in which the medial dimensions are 30 mm, the lateral dimensions are 40 mm and the length is about 50 mm. He also noted that surgeons should create holes large enough to pass sutures through without becoming tangled or flipped.

“I always like to incorporate the infraspinatus, whether I put an anchor in or do a side-to-side to repair it,” Mighell said.

For postoperative complications, Mighell noted stiffness becomes a real problem in 3% to 5% of cases. Although most patients who are stiff early on have better outcomes, according to Mighell some patients may need to undergo capsular release due to adhesions and scarring around the subscapularis and thickening of the anterior capsular. He cautioned to perform the release gently so as not to retear the rotator cuff.

“The last thing you want to do is manipulate your patient that you just fixed a rotator cuff and tear out your rotator cuff repair,” Mighell said. – by Casey Tingle

Reference:

Mighell MA, et al. Rotator Cuff Repair Complications. Presented at: Orthopedics Today Hawaii; Jan. 13-17, 2019; Waikoloa, Hawaii.

Disclosure: Mighell reports he is on the speakers bureau and is a paid consultant for DJO Surgical and Stryker, receives royalties from DJO Surgical and receives research support as a primary investigator for Stryker.

###

Outpatient total shoulder replacement: Pick the right patients, set the proper mindset

By | FOI in the News, Our Physicians

Healio

BY: Kristine Houck, MA, ELS
January 9, 2018

Outpatient total shoulder replacement: Pick the right patients, set the proper mindset

KOLOA, Hawaii – With many compelling reasons for outpatient total shoulder replacement surgery, orthopedic surgeons need to be aware that one of the biggest factors for success is the mindset of the patients, said a presenter at Orthopedics Today Hawaii 2018, here.

“Some of outpatient surgery is the way we explain this to patients,” Mark A. Mighell, MD, said. “By doing this and by having a well-organized team, there are certain patients who would benefit greatly.”

Mighell said a successful outpatient total joint replacement program needs to have buy-in from multiple stakeholders. The programs also need centers of excellence; a dedicated shoulder team; established pathways for postoperative issues; cooperation from anesthesia and administration teams; and implant and vendor costs. Patient selection is also key, he said.

“Patient selection – this is where the rubber meets the road,” he said. “You have to pick the right patients.”

Studies have shown the best candidates are patients younger than 70 years, patients with a BMI of less than 35 kg/mand the absence of significant cardiopulmonary comorbidities, he said. Patients must have private insurance, as outpatient shoulder replacement cannot be offered to patients with governmental insurance. Mighell said published studies have shown no significant differences in complications and no significant differences in readmission rates between properly selected patients. He also advised surgeons to have mechanisms in place to mitigate blood loss. Other critical issues are enhanced, pain control procedures and having the proper infrastructure to address postoperative management issues.

“You want to make sure your patient can get in touch with you,” he said. – by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

Reference:

Mighell MA. Outpatient shoulder arthroplasty: How to ensure success and safety. Presented at: Orthopedics Today Hawaii 2018; Jan. 7-11, 2018; Koloa, Hawaii.

Disclosure: Mighell reports he receives royalties from NewClip Technics; is a consultant for and is on the speakers bureau for DJO Surgical and Stryker; and does contracted research for Stryker.

How Seniors Can Truly Benefit from Low-Impact Workouts

By | FOI in the News, Our Physicians

50 Plus Life

January 3, 2019
BY: Christopher W. Grayson

How Seniors Can Truly Benefit from Low-Impact Workouts

Activity is vital at any life stage. It helps children develop correctly, keeps adults healthy and reduces the impact of old age in seniors.

Elders that stay active can enjoy various benefits to their well-being, even from low-impact workouts.

Still, it isn’t always easy to keep motivated to work out, especially during these cold winter days. To avoid loss of motivation, seniors should always keep in mind how beneficial exercise can be for them.

Let’s have a look at how seniors can genuinely benefit from low-impact workouts, as well as what the best low-impact workouts are.

Better Mental Health

Whichever form of exercise you choose, it’s sure to produce endorphins.
Activities in nature will further increase the impact of the “feel good” hormone, ensuring you’ll feel satisfied and happy afterward. Nature walks or hikes, cycling, and yoga can serve you well in reducing bad moods and improving your overall mental health.
Exercise has an exceptionally positive impact on insomnia and other sleeping problems, which are common in seniors.

Better Physical Health

Regular activity prevents or lowers the risk of many illnesses and keeps your body strong and healthy. Working out improves the immune system, which is especially crucial for elders, as they are more vulnerable to diseases.
But low-impact workouts don’t only keep diseases at bay. They also reduce the risk of falling by improving strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination. Even the most basic, low-impact exercise, such as walking, can help, as long as it’s done regularly.

More Social Engagement

One of the best things about exercise is that it doesn’t have to be a solitary activity. Likeminded seniors can get together for walks or hiking.
Having company usually improves accountability as well, so you’ll be more motivated to keep up with your workout habits.
Another right way to stay active while enjoying company is signing up for dancing or a fitness class. By maintaining social ties, you’ll keep loneliness at bay as well.

Improved Brain Function

According to multiple studies, physical activity also has a positive influence on cognitive function. Exercise improves and fine tunes our motor skills, which, in turn, keep our mind sharp.
Active seniors have less risk of dementia, regardless of whether they’ve always been active or not. What matters is that you stay physically active.

Best Low-Impact Exercises

Sometimes seniors can find the idea of exercise intimidating due to fear of falling or injury. It is precisely why low-impact workouts are recommended, as they are relatively easy compared to full-blown workout routines.
Walking is the easiest one to get into and provides a full-body workout. The same goes for swimming, which is considered one of the safest solutions for exercising when joint health is in question.
Stretching and yoga are great for building flexibility and balance or maintaining them in old age. Alternatively, you might want to take up cycling, dancing, or tai chi.

Ultimately, staying active is one of the best ways to ensure a good quality of life even if you’re well into your senior years.

Christopher W. Grayson, M.D., Florida Orthopaedic Institute, is board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Grayson is the author of multiple articles in peer-reviewed journals.